The value of “who else can say that

Awe is a common response when you meet someone who’s done something different whether its having;

Run the Gobi Ultra,
Jumped from 30,000ft,
Built a house with your own two hands,
Spent 2 years in a poverty-stricken country giving,

When you’ve left someone with the feeling of awe you’ve sparked curiosity, you’ve made them a believer and you’ve firmly imprinted your brand in the brain. You’ll never be forgotten.

And so, when times are tough and transformations are lacking belief or job opportunities aren’t quite biting (at least we should believe it) we need to exercise what enables us to create that feeling of awe. What makes us scarce?

Is it a stint in Hawassa?
Is it launching the business’ sustainability program?
Is it driving outside of office culture that nourishes the work inside the four walls?
Is it having overcome 1 year without a label on your resume but finding a career turnaround with a leap?

“Who else can say they’ve done that?”

Meaningful points of differentiation, they’ll help you win over naysayers and keep you ahead of a longlist. 

The key is meaningful, saying you’ve successfully transitioned between factories producing 1 million pairs in Vietnam without losing output is impressive and sometimes more clear-cut.

But for many the career path we’ve taken hasn’t put us into extra-ordinary circumstances and you’ll have to find the lore in what you think may bore.

A generous exercise for the self is asking yourself what you’ve done that not many others have, because if you’re in this email. Chances are you have more than one story to tell.

Leaving your audience with a sense of awe takes a bit of courage, vulnerability and dare I say it assertiveness. Just make sure you’re not speaking to fish about taking flight.

Keep it radical